Simple Lessons for Young Sales Executives: 3 Ways to Ratchett Up Performance

As young people are stepping out as entrepreneurs and launching their startups, an eccentric trend is coming into view. The sales department is being run by up and coming youngsters who are talented but lacking in productivity. They are nice and friendly to deal with and compelling enough to close leads that are hot and immediate. Sadly, they lack the experience, dedication, and personal organization needed to deal with leads that require more than one step of follow-up.

Personal organization is the most crucial intrinsic skill of a sales executive and this is just what the sales executives on the market front are lacking. Personal organization single-handedly can help you achieve a 100% follow-through rate, you have our word!

The problem with most sales executives is that they cannot organize their ideas, leads, and business cards in one place. This often leads to the misplacement of business cards of pertinent leads and losses worth several hundred thousand dollars to the company.

You may have not paid much heed to the clutter before, prevalent in the work space of so many sales executives, but if we have made you realize a mistake we will also help you rectify it.

Below are the three musts for sales executives if they wish to practice better organization and seize every big opportunity that comes their way.

1.      Systemized Gathering

Sales executives need systemized gathering of all the leads, ideas, and business cards in one place. Many sales executives make the mistake of scattering their leads’ business cards all over their office. When these business cards are required, sales executives waste precious time and often important leads in searching for business cards and leads’ contact information.

2.      Systemized Processing

Second only to better organization of business cards, leads, and ideas, comes their systemized, automated processing. Sales executives must establish a routinely clean-up of business cards, leads, ideas, and other clutter lying around the office so that none of them are left to rot away in towering piles. They need to dedicate a set time, weekly or monthly, and go through the organized pile established in step 1. All the items regarding leads present in your archives, drawers, and phone storage must be looked at and processed by the end of each week, if not every two days.

3.      Automated Calendaring

Sales executives need an automated calendar system that reminds them to process leads and business cards timely. Most of you would feel that the paper calendar resting on your office table will suffice. But let us remind you, if you are not in the habit of referring to that paper calendar and taking action upon its reminders, then that paper calendar is quite useless.

A phone-based calendaring system serves much better in this regard. It buzzes and continues to interrupt your on-going activity until you have transitioned to the next important activity on the schedule. Phone-based calendar is more infallible than your forgetful, fallible mind and more portable than a paper calendar. Why not make use of the technology at your disposal and move as much of your data/work to a digital portal as is possible.

These basic tips for better personal organization may not come as a surprise to any sales executives; however, they are largely lacking in professionals these days. And even if the tips seem pretty obvious to you, the benefits of following them through can help you reach milestones!

Brenda Cagara has been writing for websites, articles and blogs for five years now. She had a fair share of writing on variety of niches but her main focus on sale, business and finance. Currently, she is working with rak offshore company setup (Riz & Mona) that offers company formation and business setup in Dubai. Other services are visa processing, branch office Dubai, bank account opening, trade license, product registration and many more.

 

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Selling Technology to the C-Suite: Making the Complex Actionable

selling technology, selling the c-suite

Image courtesy of Victor Habbick @freedigitalphotos.net

We’ve all seen sit-coms showing nerds at Star Trek or Lord of the Rings Conventions, laughing at the esoteric, inside-baseball, goofy factoids that everyone in attendance knows about and the audience doesn’t.  That super-geek behavior is what makes it funny.  They’re talking their own special language of techie pop-culture, yet it is Greek to the rest of us.  If you’re company sells technology products and services, and that is a lot of firms these days, beware your sales approach to the buyer who isn’t as up to speed on the hi-tech bells and whistles as you have become.  You might seem just as alien as the Hobbits from the TV convention, except it won’t be funny when you end up losing the sale.

This happens more often than not when well-versed sales engineers get past the high-tech user audience and need to pitch to the C-suite.  Those real decision-makers speak a language of their own, and you need to learn it if you want them to start scratching out checks. Read More…

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Rolodex Rainmaking: The Real Truth

rolodex rainmaker, business development

image courtesy of cooldesign @ freedigitalphotos.net

New business development, defined as new customers that are actually buying your products and services, is the lifeblood for most businesses, at least those that are trying to grow. Unfortunately, many entrepreneurs, owners and CEOs oversimplify the business development process to what sales or BD person has the biggest Rolodex. That’s a critical mistake, and many top executives fail to learn from history and make it over, and over, and over…

So just how should CEOs be looking at new business development to actually get a real and sizable return on investment? Read More…

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Resurrecting Repeat Business with Stale Client Accounts

Have you been having a good year selling?  Maybe you’ve had a good couple of years, landing new accounts faster than your office buddies can parrot, “Whazzzzuppppp!”  Great.  How healthy is your repeat sales pipeline?  You know, the sales where existing clients come to you for more of your stuff (goods or services), where the cost of the sale is much lower because rapport and trust were already established, the easy sales.  You’re hesitating.  Do you mean to tell me that your repeat sales pipeline isn’t full?  How embarrassing for you. 

Don’t feel so bad.  Sometimes we all get so busy prospecting and closing new deals that we neglect current accounts or even lose once solid business because we haven’t paid that customer a visit in a while.  This business need not be lost forever.  Here are a few quick tips to get your foot back in the door of lost accounts and open the floodgates to your repeat sales pipeline. Read More…

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The 4-Letter Word You Can Say on TV

When I was a kid, way back in the seventies, a rather infamous comedian named George Carlin had a bit on profanity about the seven words you can’t say on television. Funny how times change. Half of them are heard regularly on prime time now, and the rest are surely making regular appearances on the cable networks. I’m not going to tell you what they are because this is a professional column and frankly, I don’t remember them all. Go get George’s CD.

In business, I’ve noticed a dirty word that many “professionals” don’t dare utter either, especially when describing themselves and what they do. Curious? The word is a verb with highly negative connotations that have been heaped upon it over the years. It rhymes with hell, which is where many people think they will reserve their room in if they engage in this practice. It is of course, sell. That’s S – E – double hockey sticks – SELL. Read More…

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Discovering Consultative Sales: B2B Selling Process Tips

In 2011 and beyond, the art of selling has gotten a lot more complicated.  The public has become conditioned to having their own ice cream flavors and stars named after them.  This can’t help but translate to the decision makers in business.  With so much emphasis on “ME”, you need to learn what the customer wants specifically by Discovering Consultative Sales, vital to the B2B Selling Process.

Picture this: you are at your best prospect’s company trying to find sales for your products and services.  You’re dressed to kill in your best suit; even the coffee stain you got this morning when gesturing to a passing motorist is camouflaged in your paisley tie.  You’re ready.  Then why are you so nervous when you begin your presentation, sensing failure with this prospect like you’ve seen so many times before?  Why don’t you believe she’ll see the value in what you’ve got to offer?  It could just be because you are forcing the B2B selling process instead of discovering sales opportunities.  There is a critical difference.

Like you, I believe I am always selling something.  I’ve rationalized that SELL is not a four-letter word in the colloquial sense.  Read More…

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The Expectations Game

Did you ever take on an assignment at work, or try to implement something at your company, that sounded so good—but turned out so wrong?  I mean, you did everything you said you were going to do, when you said you were going to do it, and the boss–or the employees–or the client—was still dissatisfied.  I have.  In fact, I just came from a meeting with a client who will probably cancel a project that’s only halfway complete.   It was painful.  I walked into the meeting room and ten or twelve people, hands folded and heads in their chests, stared mutely ahead as if the methadone clinic had just made an office visit, while I was figuratively toe-tagged and put on a slab.  I squirmed for an hour and a half while I heard how the software template that took me a year of work didn’t hold any value for the company.  To me those words sounded like Captain Quint’s fingernails scraping across the chalk board at the town hall meeting; “Aye.  You gotta shark out there…a big one” ringing in my ears.  Three weeks earlier I thought everything was hunky-dory.  I realized then that I had lost the expectations game–mine, and theirs. Read More…

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