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Simple Lessons for Young Sales Executives: 3 Ways to Ratchett Up Performance

As young people are stepping out as entrepreneurs and launching their startups, an eccentric trend is coming into view. The sales department is being run by up and coming youngsters who are talented but lacking in productivity. They are nice and friendly to deal with and compelling enough to close leads that are hot and immediate. Sadly, they lack the experience, dedication, and personal organization needed to deal with leads that require more than one step of follow-up.

Personal organization is the most crucial intrinsic skill of a sales executive and this is just what the sales executives on the market front are lacking. Personal organization single-handedly can help you achieve a 100% follow-through rate, you have our word!

The problem with most sales executives is that they cannot organize their ideas, leads, and business cards in one place. This often leads to the misplacement of business cards of pertinent leads and losses worth several hundred thousand dollars to the company.

You may have not paid much heed to the clutter before, prevalent in the work space of so many sales executives, but if we have made you realize a mistake we will also help you rectify it.

Below are the three musts for sales executives if they wish to practice better organization and seize every big opportunity that comes their way.

1.      Systemized Gathering

Sales executives need systemized gathering of all the leads, ideas, and business cards in one place. Many sales executives make the mistake of scattering their leads’ business cards all over their office. When these business cards are required, sales executives waste precious time and often important leads in searching for business cards and leads’ contact information.

2.      Systemized Processing

Second only to better organization of business cards, leads, and ideas, comes their systemized, automated processing. Sales executives must establish a routinely clean-up of business cards, leads, ideas, and other clutter lying around the office so that none of them are left to rot away in towering piles. They need to dedicate a set time, weekly or monthly, and go through the organized pile established in step 1. All the items regarding leads present in your archives, drawers, and phone storage must be looked at and processed by the end of each week, if not every two days.

3.      Automated Calendaring

Sales executives need an automated calendar system that reminds them to process leads and business cards timely. Most of you would feel that the paper calendar resting on your office table will suffice. But let us remind you, if you are not in the habit of referring to that paper calendar and taking action upon its reminders, then that paper calendar is quite useless.

A phone-based calendaring system serves much better in this regard. It buzzes and continues to interrupt your on-going activity until you have transitioned to the next important activity on the schedule. Phone-based calendar is more infallible than your forgetful, fallible mind and more portable than a paper calendar. Why not make use of the technology at your disposal and move as much of your data/work to a digital portal as is possible.

These basic tips for better personal organization may not come as a surprise to any sales executives; however, they are largely lacking in professionals these days. And even if the tips seem pretty obvious to you, the benefits of following them through can help you reach milestones!

Brenda Cagara has been writing for websites, articles and blogs for five years now. She had a fair share of writing on variety of niches but her main focus on sale, business and finance. Currently, she is working with rak offshore company setup (Riz & Mona) that offers company formation and business setup in Dubai. Other services are visa processing, branch office Dubai, bank account opening, trade license, product registration and many more.

 

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How to Double Your Sales Wins Before Your First Call

double your sales wins, sales call plan

image courtesy Wrigley Corp.

Anyone engaged in selling, be it a salesperson or a business owner that promotes her own company, wants to develop new business from new and existing clients.  Unfortunately, most sales professionals lose the sale before they even make their first sales calls, and don’t even know why, chalking it up to a numbers game they can only control by knocking on more doors.  Well people, in my brain, my closure rate is to number of calls as margin is to gross sales—I’d rather call on half the prospects to get the same numbers. Read More…

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Surviving a Competitive Price War: 5 Best Practices

In the business world, the prices of commodities often change. This usually stems from the unstable market forces as a result of the recent recession slump. The increasing pressure to keep sales high forces business owners to slash their prices in an effort to recoup their losses. This is what instigates price wars.

Price wars generally start as firms are fighting for a larger market share in a declining market. Some firms become so desperate that they initiate aggressive growth strategies. These firms believe that by driving their competitors out of business, they will be able to assert themselves in a dominant position in the market and dictate the prices. In theory, this is one way to get a larger piece of the market pie however, more often than not, they forget to think about how their competitors will respond. There are generally two actions you can take: to respond or to ignore it. The best way to survive a price war is to avoid it; however, there are times when you have to take certain measures to defend your business. So how exactly can you do this? Read More…

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The 4-Letter Word You Can Say on TV

When I was a kid, way back in the seventies, a rather infamous comedian named George Carlin had a bit on profanity about the seven words you can’t say on television. Funny how times change. Half of them are heard regularly on prime time now, and the rest are surely making regular appearances on the cable networks. I’m not going to tell you what they are because this is a professional column and frankly, I don’t remember them all. Go get George’s CD.

In business, I’ve noticed a dirty word that many “professionals” don’t dare utter either, especially when describing themselves and what they do. Curious? The word is a verb with highly negative connotations that have been heaped upon it over the years. It rhymes with hell, which is where many people think they will reserve their room in if they engage in this practice. It is of course, sell. That’s S – E – double hockey sticks – SELL. Read More…

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The Expectations Game

Did you ever take on an assignment at work, or try to implement something at your company, that sounded so good—but turned out so wrong?  I mean, you did everything you said you were going to do, when you said you were going to do it, and the boss–or the employees–or the client—was still dissatisfied.  I have.  In fact, I just came from a meeting with a client who will probably cancel a project that’s only halfway complete.   It was painful.  I walked into the meeting room and ten or twelve people, hands folded and heads in their chests, stared mutely ahead as if the methadone clinic had just made an office visit, while I was figuratively toe-tagged and put on a slab.  I squirmed for an hour and a half while I heard how the software template that took me a year of work didn’t hold any value for the company.  To me those words sounded like Captain Quint’s fingernails scraping across the chalk board at the town hall meeting; “Aye.  You gotta shark out there…a big one” ringing in my ears.  Three weeks earlier I thought everything was hunky-dory.  I realized then that I had lost the expectations game–mine, and theirs. Read More…

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